New Song About Confederate Flag

April 9th, 2013

So, while I was at home this weekend, my mom was watching CMT and there was an interview with Brad Paisley about one of his new songs called Accidental Racist which features L.L. Cool J.  The song is about how different people view the Confederate flag and how see it as racist although that may not be what the wearer may be trying to portray…either way, enjoy.

Sorry I couldn’t find the actual interview..but here’s the song.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q4bq4hP35yc

Gettysburg Movie Post

April 3rd, 2013

The movie Gettysburg plays into the Lost Cause ideology of the south in multiple ways.  One way this is seen from the beginning of the movie is anytime General Lee talks, you can hear the strong beliefs of Christianity throughout the movie.  When Lee is not talking about the war being “in god’s hands now,” he is talking about evening the odds or the soldier number differences between the Union and Confederate Armies.  There are also different times in the movie where different Southern soldiers point out that they are not fighting because of the slaves.  When a Confederate infantryman gets captured by the Union, he talks to Chamberlain stating that he fights for his rights and that is it.  Later in the movie, General Longstreet is talking to an Englishman telling him that the south should have freed the slaves and then seceded.

On the other side of the battle, Colonel Chamberlain talks about why the northerners are fighting the war.  Chamberlain takes an emancipation stance by saying that they are fighting “to set other men free…the idea that we all have value…fighting for each other.”  Not once does Chamberlain talk about fighting to maintain the Union.

In class we talked about how slavery is forgotten in much of the Civil War memory, and I feel this is very apparent in Gettysburg.  Although I feel the movie does a wonderful job portraying the war, I understand the argument Gallagher makes in the chapter Lee and His Generals.  No matter how important military standpoints and battles may be, it is also important to look into the political and social battles.  I believe that Gettysburg looks over many of these important points to drive home the idea of the Lost Cause.  It is not in your face but the Confederacy does not miss an opportunity to talk about the shortage of weapons and the odds going against the forces of the Union.

Gone With the Wind Fun

March 29th, 2013

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RRI2GfNYZR0

For those of you who haven’t seen the full video…you should really take the time to watch it..it’s hilarious!!!

Totally shows a different aspect to the movie…haha.

Doubleday Documentary

March 26th, 2013

I really hope I did this right…

 

Documentary Bibliography

‘Baseball Think Factory’. Accessed 19 February 2013. http://www.baseballthinkfactory.org/.

Birdsall, Ralph. The Story of Cooperstown. New York: C. Scribner’s Sons, 1925.

Bob Thorp. Take Me Out To The Ballgame. Accessed 22 March 2013. http://archive.org/details/TakeMeOutToTheBallgame.

Chafets, Zeʾev. Cooperstown Confidential: Heroes, Rogues, and the Inside Story of the Baseball Hall of Fame. 1st U.S. ed. New York: Bloomsbury, 2009.

Cleaves, Freeman. Meade of Gettysburg. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1960.

Corcoran High School Wind Ensemble Christmas Concert 2011. AC Cadence. Accessed 23 March 2013. http://archive.org/details/CorcoranHighSchoolWindEnsembleChristmasConcert2011.

Doubleday, Abner. Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. Campaigns of the Civil War VI. New York: C. Scribner’s Sons, 1882.

———. Reminiscences of Forts Sumter and Moultrie in 1860-61. New York: Harper & brothers, 1876.

Gettysburg as the Generals Remembered It: Postwar Perspectives of Ten Commanders. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2010.

Holzman, Robert S. General ‘Baseball’ Doubleday; the Story of Baseball and of Its Inventor. 1st ed. New York: Longmans, Green, 1955.

John Fogerty. Centerfield. Accessed 24 March 2013. http://archive.org/details/ATACenterfieldCenterfieldmp3.

Meade, George Gordon. The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-general United States Army. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1913.

Nucciarone, Monica. ‘Alexander Cartwright | SABR’. Accessed 19 February 2013. http://sabr.org/bioproj/person/09ed3dd4.

Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps. Bluehill Fife and Drum. Accessed 24 March 2013. http://archive.org/details/BluehillFifeAndDrum.

Sickles, Daniel E. “Further Recollections of Gettysburg.” The North American Review 152, no. 412 (1 March 1891): 257–286. doi:10.2307/25102141.

Slocum, Henry W, Doubleday, Abner, Doubleday, Comte de Paris, Philippe, and Oliver Otis Howard. “Gettysburg Thirty Years After.” The North American Review 152, no. 411 (1 February 1891): 129–147.

 The Union Generals Speak: The Meade Hearings on the Battle of Gettysburg. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2003.

Thorn, John. Baseball in the Garden of Eden: The Secret History of the Early Game. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2011.

Wheeler, Richard. Witness to Gettysburg. New York: Harper & Row, 1987.

 

Black Female Memoirs

March 20th, 2013

http://www.markuswiener.com/?p=730

I was searching the web…and I thought that this was really cool.  This is the first female African American to write a memoir about the Civil War.  I think this would be a really different read!  Definitely worth taking a look at!

For Those of Us Working on Documentaries

March 7th, 2013

http://www.desktop-documentaries.com/making-documentaries.html

I just thought I’d post this for those of us working on documentaries because I found it to be useful, seeing as I needed a little direction…

 

Have a good break!

Funny History

February 22nd, 2013

So…I’m sure many of us have seen at least one of these videos, but I came across the Epic Rap Battles of History the other day when I was just surfing the web, and there is an Abraham Lincoln one…so naturally I had to investigate, and I thought that it was really funny how they would use some facts to create their argument.

Annotated Bibliography

February 19th, 2013

Multiple Authors. ‘Baseball Think Factory’. Multiple Dates Depending on Blog. http://www.baseballthinkfactory.org/.

 

The Baseball Think Factory is a blog that allows anyone to search the database for anything baseball related.  In my case, I’m able to look up people’s opinions and thoughts about Abner Doubleday.  These blogs are useful to see what the memory of Doubleday is in the twenty-first century.

 

Birdsall, Ralph. The Story of Cooperstown. New York: C. Scribner’s Sons, 1925.

Birdsall gives the background of the invention of baseball and how the Doubleday myth was created.  He also gives evidence to Doubleday being the inventor of baseball, but he also shows insight to the use of baseball during the Civil War by the soldiers.  This shows why people remember Doubleday as the inventor of baseball and how their memories have been altered to praise Doubleday and Cooperstown as the birthplace of baseball.

 

Chafets, Zeʾev. Cooperstown Confidential: Heroes, Rogues, and the Inside Story of the Baseball Hall of Fame. New York: Bloomsbury, 2009.

 

Chafets discuss the debate over the true inventor of baseball.  He looks at different baseball invention stories, such as those of Doubleday and Chadwick.  While Chadwick was arguing that baseball had foreign origins, Chafets said that Spalding argued baseball had an American identity.  Chafets connects baseball and Doubleday to what it means to be American, which was disputed during and after the Civil War.  It will be interesting to see how this will play an effect on the American memory of Doubleday and the Civil War.

 

Cleaves, Freeman. Meade of Gettysburg. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1960.

 

In Meade of Gettysburg, Cleaves goes into detail about the military position of General George Meade.  Meade was a Union General during the Civil War, who seemed to have a negative opinion of Doubleday.  It will be interesting to look into their relationship and see if Meade’s thoughts of Doubleday affected the memory of Doubleday.  Meade’s thoughts already took hold of Doubleday’s position as General in the Army, when Meade demoted him, but maybe there were further implications after or during the war.

 

Doubleday, Abner. Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. Campaigns of the Civil War VI. New York: C. Scribner’s Sons, 1882.

 

This is a firsthand account written by Abner Doubleday about his Northern campaigns.  Doubleday expresses his belief that it is the commanders duty, and those more prominent in the war, to write their own memoirs and record their thoughts and feelings during the war.  Doubleday wanted to show his prominence in the war and one can see what he wanted people to remember him for during the war.  Doubleday’s memoirs show what he remembers as most prominent and also allows me to create my own memory of Doubleday.

 

———. Reminiscences of Forts Sumter and Moultrie in 1860-61. New York: Harper & brothers, 1876.

 

Another firsthand account written by Doubleday that talks about the first battles of the war.  Doubleday is remembered as being the first to shoot, in defence, at the start of the Civil War.  This remembrance of Doubleday shows him as a leader as he positions the South to be traitors and attacking the Union as a rebellion.

 

Gettysburg as the Generals Remembered It: Postwar Perspectives of Ten Commanders. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2010

 

Gettysburg as the Generals Remembered It shows the remembrance of Gettysburg from the perspectives of ten different commanders.  One of these commanders is Doubleday himself.  It is interesting to position these generals next to each other and see where details overlap and where details seem to differ.  The opinions of the commanders and what they think is important to preserve will be interesting to compare, along with their views of other generals and whether they agreed with different aspects of the war or if they were following orders.

 

Wiles, Tim. ‘History | Baseball Hall of Fame’. http://baseballhall.org/museum/experience/history.

 

The Baseball Hall of Fame website gave a great background about Abner Doubleday.  The website also acknowledged the Doubleday myth.  In addition, the website explained why many Americans would chose to believe it during the present day.  It is interesting to see this myth coming from such a prominent voice in American baseball; one would not think to find such thing as myths on official websites.

 

Holzman, Robert S. General ‘Baseball’ Doubleday; the Story of Baseball and of Its Inventor. 1st ed. New York: Longmans, Green, 1955.

 

Holzman talks about the beginning of baseball and tracks its development before the war.  He also ties the game to different times during the war to show how the game affected those on the battlefield.  He follows the development of baseball after the war, while tracking the life of Doubleday after the war.  He then turns to thoughts of baseball in the present day and the meaning that gets installed into the minds of the youths of America.  Holzman offers an interesting perspective by intertwining baseball with Doubleday, which many authors will do briefly but Holzman does throughout his book.

 

Meade, George Gordon. The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-general United States Army. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1913.

 

These letters of George Meade’s show his insight during and after the war.  Some of the letters are addressed to and from Doubleday.  I thought it would be interesting to see what Meade thought of Doubleday because Meade demoted Doubleday after the death of Reynolds.  There seemed to be an argument between the Meade and Doubleday, and Doubleday seemed to never forgive Meade.  I think this will prove to be an important insight into Doubleday’s character.

 

Nucciarone, Monica. ‘Alexander Cartwright | SABR’. http://sabr.org/bioproj/person/09ed3dd4.

 

Monica Nucciarone seems to be the expert on Alexander Cartwright, who is the opposing story to Abner Doubleday as the inventor of baseball.  Nucciarone acknowledges Doubleday but finds it hard to believe he is the sole inventor of baseball.  I thought it would be interesting to look into a different perspective on the Doubleday myth to see how those who do not buy into the myth remember Abner Doubleday.

 

Sickles, Daniel E., Daniel Gregg M., John Newton, and Daniel Butterfield. ‘Further Recollections of Gettysburg’. The North American Review 152, no. 412 (1 March 1891): 257–286.

 

These outside perspectives of different Generals during Gettysburg talk about the overall happenings and outcomes of Gettysburg.  In this memoir, it is interesting to see how General Doubleday fit into the big picture of Gettysburg and show how his comrades viewed him on and off the battlefield.  Doubleday’s Civil War memory is shown throughout different memoirs and as different opinions surface, it will be interesting to look at them all while comparing and coming to different conclusions of their relationships to Doubleday.

 

Slocum, Henry W., Abner Doubleday, Philippe Comte de Paris, and Oliver Otis Howard. ‘Gettysburg Thirty Years After’. The North American Review 152, no. 411 (1 February 1891): 129–147.

 

This document shows the remembrance of Gettysburg only thirty years after the battle.  This proved to be interesting because it gave a perfect middle ground, meaning it offered insight after the war but also before the present.  The different people of this council were able to look back and understand some of the troubles of the time and also perhaps shine light on things that they could have done differently or the inevitable, think about how things could have gone if the South had won.

 

The Union Generals Speak: The Meade Hearings on the Battle of Gettysburg. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2003.

 

The different Generals that appeared at the Battle of Gettysburg are giving their thoughts on Meade after the battle.  The council is split pro and anti Meade followers.  One of the Generals present is Doubleday, who has a bone to pick with Meade because of his position lost to Newton.  The council also discusses the mission of tracking down Lee and bringing him to justice.  This is an interesting view which can be used to see if Doubleday was truly bias in his opinion of Meade or if other Generals sided with Doubleday.   This is yet another look into Doubleday’s character.

 

Thorn, John. Baseball in the Garden of Eden: The Secret History of the Early Game. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2011.

 

Thorn, who is a baseball enthusiast, looks into the myths and history of baseball to search for the truth.  He looks into the events that defined baseball as the American pastime and shows many of the controversies that surround the sport.  I thought it was interesting that he pointed out that neither Doubleday nor Cartwright, the two people most have thought to create baseball, knew that they created baseball.  Thorn then goes on to see how baseball is remembered in society and how it is remembered inside the sport itself, from the game to the Hall of Fame.

 

Wheeler, Richard. Witness to Gettysburg. New York: Harper & Row, 1987.

 

Wheeler gives insight to the military side of Doubleday’s life.  He writes about the different connections Doubleday had with prominent Civil War heroes, such as Chamberlain, Reynolds, and Meade.  This memory of Doubleday during the Civil War is very brief which shows I have some more digging to do, but this book gave me a lot of insight on where to start.

 

Yorktown and the Civil War

February 13th, 2013

I grew up in Yorktown and thought that I would look into the different Civil War memorials around the area.  So while searching, I saw this online and never really realized that there were 2,000 Civil War troops buried in Yorktown.  This is soo interesting to me because this is a place that is 2 seconds from my high school and I have passed this cemetery hundreds of times.  I always thought that the cemetery only had revolutionary soldiers because it is next to Surrender road, where Cornwallis surrendered to Washington. I can’t wait to visit next time I am home!

http://www.nps.gov/history/nr/travel/national_cemeteries/Virginia/Yorktown_National_Cemetery.html

Abner Doubleday

January 29th, 2013

I found this online while I was doing some research on my topic and was glad to come across the Arlington Cemetery site.  I think it is interesting that many people today still remember Abner Doubleday as the inventor of baseball, although, we have no proof of it.  I really want to find new and maybe other Abner Doubleday myths.

 

http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/doubledy.htm